Hugh Jackman Wolverine

INTERVIEW: Hugh Jackman, Steroids and Crying Like a Girl

The first image from the upcoming Wolverine starring Hugh Jackman was released yesterday.  This film had a few production problems when Darren Aronofsky dropped out and the earthquake struck the Fukushima nuclear reactors near where they were planning to shoot, which was kind of meta when you think about it: this is an X-Men character after all.  Still, I doubt it was radiation that turned Jackman into the super-shredded, spray-tanned, heavily vascular creature he is in that picture.

Interview with Barbara Harris, Lead Singer of The Toys

BAKER STREET | INTERVIEW

by Eric J Baker

A distinct pleasure of being obsessed with music: Falling in love with an album that should be considered a classic but has been overlooked. You get to feel superior because you are a finder of lost treasure… and outraged at everyone else’s foolishness and bad taste. We can admit that righteous indignation is kinda fun, can’t we? And if you want to see enough indignation to clear a room, ask me about The Toys’ one and only album from 1966.

The Toys, by height: June Montiero, Barbara Parritt, and Barbara Harris.

For lack of a more enlightened term, The Toys were a mid-1960s “girl group” comprised of June Montiero, Barbara Parritt, and lead vocalist Barbara Harris and are best known for the 1965 smash hit single, “A Lover’s Concerto.” The accompanying album is the Magical Mystery Tour of girl-group records, but more on that in a minute. First, we must discuss The Song.

Interview: D. R. Hildebrand

Author D.R. Hildebrand

by James Tuttle

D. R. Hildebrand, a model, is the author of Walking Marina.

JAMES:  Just how autobiographical is Walking Marina?  There are some pretty graphic sexual situations involving the protagonist whose name also begins with a “D” and more than one involves a cash transaction.  Hmmm.

D. R.:  So essentially you want to know if I’m a big ho’.  Nope.  Sorry, James, it’s fiction.  But it feels real—thank you—because it’s inspired by years at castings, listening to models tell some very graphic stories.   I started creating a plot out of their diverse and intriguing experiences, peppered here and there with some of my own.  But it certainly isn’t autobiographical, which is better because my life really isn’t all that fascinating.


JAMES:  You paint a vivid picture in your book of the Great Divide in the business between male and female models, where the girls are working steadily and the guys are waiting for scraps.  Do you think that it’s possible that, male or female, the most in-demand faces are getting all the jobs whether it’s Lara Stone and Karlie Kloss or Jon Kortajarena and Clement Chabernaud?

D. R.:  Definitely!  And that’s part of the reason why I wrote the last chapter as I did, but when women are booking 80% to 90% of all modeling jobs in New York, it’s difficult to argue that any parity exists.  An article in V Man a few years back put it all quite plainly: “Modeling has always been a woman’s world—economics and simple psychology have conspired to make it so.”  Walking Marina simply exposes this world.  It takes modeling, the most obvious exception to patriarchy’s rule of supremacy, and uses it as a mirror.